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Boeing, a New Plane, Two Crashes and Major Safety Concerns

It must be pointed out that Boeing is an impeccably safe aircraft manufacturer, which has safely and successfully transported billions of air passengers over many years. As a matter of fact, almost anyone, who has ever taken an aircraft, is more than likely to have flown a Boeing plane than other brand.

Given Boeing's unmatched safety record and sound reputation as a commercial  aircraft manufacturer, major safety concerns have surfaced that the mega company has not voluntarily grounded the popular planes - the 737-MAX8 in the aftermath of two major crashes involving the aircraft, in the short span of five-months. The 737 remains a best-seller of all times. Its MAX8 single-aisle version was first delivered in 2017 and has sold very well with many orders yet to be delivered.

Last October 29, Lion Air Flight 610, a Boeing 737-MAX8, with less than 1,000-hours of flying time, crashed into the Java Sea in Indonesia killing all 189 passengers and crew aboard the plane, which departed Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, Jakarta, headed to Depati Amir Airport in Pangkal Pinang, also in Indonesia. Reports said the plane crashed 12-minutes after take off.

Then on Sunday, March 10, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, another Boeing 737-MAX8, crashed soon after take off from Bole International Airport, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, killing all 157 passengers and crew. The flight was headed to Nairobi, Kenya. Two new similar Boeing planes crashing within five-months of each other and killing 346.

China, Ethiopia, Australia, Singapore, India, the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) among other nations,  have grounded the MAX8 until "appropriate modifications and safety measures are undertaken to ensure their safe operations," India's aviation authority, according to CNN, gave as explanation. But the MAX8 has not been grounded in the United States (US) or in Canada.

Though grounding the aircraft would be a financially costly affair, the safeguard of human lives certainly trumps any and all financial costs. Therefore, Boeing and the US FAA should take the appropriate steps to ensure the safety of all commercial air passengers.