-
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Recent Posts

Declaration of a National Emergency in the U.S. - Trump's Immigration Policy
Remembering Parkland - a Year after the School Massacre
Toward the Preservation of Democracy
Democracy goes on Trial in Spain - Catalonia Independence Leaders Face a Madrid Court
The Glory and Trials of Revolution

Most Popular Posts

Mourn with Moore
On Partnerships of Conflicting Ideologies as a Force Shaping Extremism
DC Linktank
The World in 2014 - Asia
From This Point

Categories

Elections 2013
Friends in Business
Gun control
Immigration Reform
In America
Natural Disaster
The World
Towards 2014

Archives

February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013

powered by

My Blog

Venezuela - a Challenging Test to Regional Integration

Whatever befalls the Nicolas Maduro government in Venezuela in the short run, will undoubtedly define the masked strength or the inherent weakness of regional integration in Latin America and the Caribbean. Hence, Venezuela's present predicament is a laboratory into the study of sovereignty, influence and soundness of regional integration in Latin America and the Caribbean.



While many nations in Latin America and the Caribbean could easily concur with the largely western thought that Maduro's government in Venezuela is tainted and may lack legitimacy, they are however confronted with the dilemma of supporting an American-Canadian-European fix to Maduro's tenure in lieu of their own regional solution to the ending crisis.



Direct regional acceptance of the American-Canadian recognition of opposition leader Juan Guaido as interim president of Venezuela would amount to yielding to dictated influence from large influential partners. Similarly, regional support of Europe's demand for an immediate redo of presidential elections in Venezuela, could imply caving in to exterior commands from past colonial masters - a further weakening of regional sovereignty.



That some regional nations would support the two actions, while others would oppose one or both of them, is affirmation of the challenge and test the Venezuelan predicament poses to deeper integration in Latin America and the Caribbean. An inherent weakness of the region has always been its reliance on solutions from elsewhere, instead of homemade remedies amid its masked strength of diversity and growing influence of the people of Latin America and the Caribbean.



The Venezuelan challenge could be won and regional integration could be deeped by regional members of the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), acting under Venezuelan law per Article 233 of the constitution, by monitoring, a recall election by popular vote and facilitating Venezuelans who have fled to Colombia and elsewhere in taking part in the democratic exercise.



[This Post is a reprint of an Article I published on LinkedIn yesterday because my Internet publisher was experiencing technical problems.]