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A Step Toward Stability on the Korean Peninsula - Two Leaders to Hold Summit

The leaders of the Koreas, North and South, have agreed to hold a summit next month hereby casting an optimism of hope to a current and a possible future era of stability on the Korean peninsula.

North and South Korea - blood relatives, split by foreign invaders, war, ideology and heavily fortified militarization zone, have not had a formal meeting between their leaders since 2007. Recent nuclear tests, ambitions and threatening rhetoric by the North Korea's Kim Jong-un heightened the likelihood of war on the peninsula.

However, via the recently completed Winter Olympics, in Pyeonchang, South Korea, an invitation to the games from the South to the North resulted in an acceptance that witnessed both nations marching together under one-flag at the games. Both nations also competed as a single entity in ice-hockey. The games also saw the unprecedented visit to the south by sister of the North's leader, thus opening up a closer realm for diplomacy between the Koreas.

The peaceful spirit of the Olympic games transcended into an invitation from the North to the South to visit Pyongyang, which was accepted, conducted and completed this week by a high delegation, which had a four-hour dinner with the reclusive Jong-un. 

The return of the delegation to Seoul, South Korea, revealed the agreement between both sides to hold a summit between the two leaders, Jong-un and Moon Jae-in, at the border village of Panmunjom, in April, the BBC-News reported, a first for the two nations in more than a decade.

The news of the summit also brought a reported willingness from the North to discuss denuclearization with the United States (US); no more missile tests while diplomacy continued; and the opening of a hot line between the leaders of the North and South.

While the US remains "cautiously optimistic" about improving North-South contacts, a greater aura of calm than at any other time in recent memory, hovers over the Korean peninsula today which could usher in a lasting period of stability to relatives, split for too long.